midcenturymodernfreak:

Monocasco Concept Bike

The Monocasco Concept Bike is an electric version inspired by the original Ossa Monocasco bike of Santiago Herrero. Reliving the legacy of the legendary Sabtiago, who died racing his Ossa in the 1970 Grand Prix, this bike is a fitting tribute. The story goes that Ossa abandoned racing altogether after this tragedy. - Via

 

midcenturymodernfreak:

Asian-Inspired Time Capsule!

Modernism in Palos Verdes, CA - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

Control Panels of the Future

1957-1967 Monsanto House of the Future | Architects: Marvin Goody & Richard Hamilton | Photos: Ralph Crane - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

UNIK Restaurant | Design: Marcelo Joulia | Palermo, Buenos Aires

Via: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

midcenturymodernfreak:

1955-57 Krisel ResidenceArchitect: William Krisel | Los Angeles, (Brentwood), CA | Photo: Julius Shulman from the archives of William Krisel at the Getty Research Institute. - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

The “Ro” Easy Chair | Design: Jaime Hayon for Fritz Hansen

This elegant chair was introduced at the 2013 Milan’s Salone Internazionale del MobileVia: 1 | 2 | 3

midcenturymodernfreak:

Paul & Leisa’s Mid-Century Michigan Home | Architect: Unknown | Built in 1958 | Photos: Tyler Merkel

As soon as you enter the home, the first thing you notice is a long, suspended rosewood-clad credenza which spans a change of levels, supported by a series of balusters which are anchored to the floor and ceiling. Fantastic. - Via

Looking at the entries made me think that photography might be finished.

Overall, I didn’t feel that there was much love for or homage to the subjects. Photographs shouldn’t project your own image, they should pay homage to the subject. There didn’t seem to be any identification with the subjects, and I wondered why the subjects hadn’t been depicted more beautifully.

The raw emotions of the artists don’t come across in the photographs. It’s as though the sweaty relationship between photographers and subjects has disappeared. The pictures aren’t even cool. They feel a bit a cold, a bit dry.

I think all this is a result of the shift to digital photography. Many of the entries highlight the way digital photography has changed how people take pictures. In the film era, the camera was so close to the photographer’s face that it almost became an eye. But the digital cameras of today are nothing more than objects. So when I said “finished,” I meant that with the world moving to digital, photographic expression as our generation knew it is finished.

Nevertheless, this might not be something to feel sad about. This new era has arrived, and it might be what the New Cosmos of Photography had always been aiming for. Perhaps these cold and dry pictures will get hotter in the future.

-Nobuyoshi Araki

excerpt from his statement at the Grand Prize selection open-committee meeting for the 2008 Canon New Cosmos award.

source

(via valerian)

(via tokyo-camera-style)

thestylebuff:

Kevin Wang & HVRMINN chilling at HVRMINN studio